Maya Bamberger, Itay Blaish, David Carnal, Ronny Koren, Domenico Roberti
Maya Bamberger, Itay Blaish, David Carnal, Ronny Koren, Domenico Roberti

Reach to Eat// Dinner #1

Maya:
We have a set of questions that are made to make people fall in love.
Ronny:
Maybe we just pick up few questions from that questionnaire?
Itay:
If you find someone attractive you do not necessarily…

David:
But now I have a question to all for of you; what made you come to Switzerland in the first place?

Itay:
For me it was a project that brought me here, it was clear to me I need to leave Tel Aviv and my future is not going to be there.

David
But Tel Aviv is a fun city!

Itay:
It is but you work your ass off and get pay very little.

David:
But why Zurich?

Itay:
Because of the summer here.

David:
Maya, so you’ve missed the summer here. I ate tomatoes from our balcony. Chill on the balcony until the sun set at 9.30 pm.

Itay:
Or swim in the Limmat with a floating bag.

Ronny:
It’s an amazing place.

Itay:
Agree, in Israel we say that the Swiss landscape is like a chocolate wrap.

Domenico:
So how do you call this salad?

Ronny:
In the salad we have spinach, almonds, dates and pita bread, and lemon zest.

Itay:
Is the recipe from Ottolenghi?

Maya:
Yes, but it could have been better if I had Sumack..

Domenico:
But usually, his recipes have A LOT of ingredients.Long list of ingredients, most of them just spices.

Ronny:
Would you like some water?

Itay:
yes please.

Maya:
the kitchen is a mess!

(George: no worries!)

Maya:
It’s my fault!

Domenico:
It’s very flavourful, Maya.

Maya:
It’s not only me, we did everything together.

Ronny:
I was the sous chef.

Maya:
No, that’s not true, we did everything together.

Ronny:
Yes but it’s mainly your recipes.

Maya:
Which I didn’t invent.

Ronny:
Ok guys I need you to raise your glasses and cheer, and I will take a photo from above.

David:
But you need to cheer as well.

Ronny:
you will cheer for me.

Ronny:
-click-click-click-

Domenico:
Looks like one of these shootings for resorts.

Itay:
Shutter Stock!

Ronny:
Getty Images

Itay:
Google query “four people cheering with wine”

Maya:
I think we need an image on Instagram tomorrow

Ronny:
Yes we should

Itay:
Instagram? Why?

Maya:
Because life is on Instagram

David:
I feel like Instagram is just the next Facebook, it will not be relevant in 5 years anymore

Maya:
We need to be there. If you do something in art or design, it’s very relevant.

Domenico:
But it’s gaining so much traction. I read this article saying that there are collectors that buy art just from Instagram. When they buy, the can pay 30-40 millions, just from liking a picture

Itay:
My master thesis project is exactly this. It’s a bit problematic to speak about it here because it’s a group of curators. I am also a curator, but of a different kind. I think that curation in galleries is obsolete. It’s old. There are so many new forms that has to be investigated. The way we consume art through internet changed so much, but people still see the galleries as the place for art, but I think nope, sorry. People become artists through Instagram, even if no art collector define them as artists, they do define themselves this way, there are actually forms that are being ignored by the art world because they are happening online.

David:
Is Banksy an artist?

Domenico:
Depends who you ask.

Maya:
Common, he is effecting the discourse, of course he is an artist.

Itay:
but that’s the problem, it is art, but in an article I read about Banksy he said: Banksy is a great artist but a graphic design exercise. You just get a small arty orgasm.

Domenico:
I agree with you, that’s exactly the conversation about high art and low art. A lot of curators in the past century have been trying so hard to knock it down that whatever forms of creativity is a type of art, but it’s the matter of context that actually decides the class of where it belongs to. We can argue that Banksy is probably not an artist that speaks to us, because we have to admit the higher you grow in the education of visual arts, the more refine and snobbish you become about what you like and what you don’t.

Itay:
I don’t think it’s low art compared to High art. It’s art, but I don’t find it interesting. I just think that if the message of his work comes so fast, and leaves so fast, it’s just not important.

Domenico:
it’s the same level of the New Yorkers sketches. I think he is very much like that.

Ronny:
But who to decide what’s are and what’s not in the artwrold? In many ways, institutions. And more specifically, the ones who set the tone of arts value are the auction houses.

Domenico:
There’s a distinction between academic and market and they just don’t always go together.

Itay:
My theory says that the discourse is owned by the art scene of galleries, curators and collectors. But suddenly you have more and more at that is available online,. In places outside of the white cube, in parties for instance. Things that didn’t happen before. I still think that the art talk is reserves to galleries, but from where I come from it’s only these alternative forms, underground. Off spaces.

Ronny:
Have you found some of these in Zurich?

Itay:
No. And the reason is because they have too much money. But you see it in Krakow, Berlin, Tel Aviv. The scene is booming.

Maya:
But it’s a different type of art.

Itay:
No, that’s exactly the mistake, that’s what curators say. And this is the problem.

Maya:
But it is!

Itay:
No, it’s not. Because it presented in a messy way, it is something different, I agree, something that could be challenged and you’re right. But the art itself, the processes art of art. But if you could think about the quality as a curator, you could have a proper exhibition. But it’s easy to dismiss it by saying: oh this space is not a gallery.

Maya:
It’s not what I think. When I consume it through the music, hipster, cool scene, I don’t feel I belong to this world.

Ronny:
I agree with you, Itay. I bought at least three pieces at LaCulture in Tel Aviv over the years. And I do think that when you nail it down you can find really good works there. It’s a market, and definitely different than the white cube.

Itay:
That’s exactly what I would like to do, to bridge it out. I feel the the visual communicator is a missing link in art shows. The curator usually is too disconnected and there should be middle men to communicate it to the world.

Maya: I actually think that graphic designers are usually looking at me like I have no idea what I’m doing.

Itay:
But I’m talking about something different, as a designer working on an art show, the designer works together with the curator. They are interested In mutual success. I’m just saying that as a designer, I can have an impact on an art show.

Ronny:
The crowd however is so different. We are talking about much cheaper works being sold in a market place; nothing like a gallery.

Itay:
That’s exactly the idea. Re-inventing the scene.What I’m suggesting to artists – how about creating works that are bought for much less, so you could have a younger crowd? I noticed its working very well.

Domenico:
The biggest things about art, is what you just said, that galleries of course sell a status and symbol, a commodity. The difference between an Artwork and a Lamborghini is that a Lamborghini never actually states any social project. Lots of artworks speak about something completely different like immigration, the artwork sometimes claims to be something completely different than what it actually is.

Maya:
Then why can’t it be both?

Domenico:
It is both, in the same time

Maya:
And when you are a super rich person but you have this migrant painting in your living room, isn’t it hypocrisy?

Domenico:
It makes the rich person feel better, as if she engages with the conversation about migration but you’re not doing anything about it. It’s like hosting a charity event.

Maya:
I think what motivated me, is the fact that artists need the money. Also gallerists.

ME, ME, ME. (ego trip)

People prosternate before you, repeating your name like a mantra.
You are standing there, in the light, a fancy cape on your shoulders.

Depending on how boring you believe the crowd will be and on how high your expectations are you may want to implement a few of these :
– make it collective. not only you will be God. take turns.

– smoothly slide in action.
step 1 : You : “Hi, I’m {first and last name}.”
All : “Hi, {first and last name}”.
Continue like this for the whole group to introduce.
step 2 : First one goes to the middle.
Reminds his name.
All bow, face to the ground
All mantra his name for a minute, and stop somehow
Continue like this for the whole group to shine

– humour should be flying around before you start

– keep it short, disperse rapidly

Possible upgrades :
– good scheduling, ideally after a drink or two
– dark room with carpets
– lamp in the middle
– smoke machine
– shiny cape
– dolphin music or musician

This score calls for no discussion, no reflection.

Score

Dorothee Richter, Photos by Nils Kontz

Studio Banks, Tel Aviv, 25 Jan 2020

Dorothee Richter, Photos by Nils Kontz, featuring Abongile

Studio Banks, Tel Aviv, 25 Jan 2020

Studio Banks, Tel Aviv, 25 Jan 2020

Photo by Nils Kontz

Studio Bank, Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv Jaffa
25.01.2020

25 January  –  16 February 2020
Small Project for Coming Communities in Tel Aviv
Exhibition at Studio Bank, Tel Aviv–Jaffa
71 Ben Yehuda st., Tel Aviv – Jaffa (corner of 16 Mapu st.)

Opening: Saturday, 25 January 2020, from 5.00pm
Opening Hours: Monday 11am–2pm, Thursday 2–5pm

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Introduction by Professor Dorothee Richter, Head of the CAS/MAS in Curating  and Director of PhD in Practice in Curating, Practice-Based Doctoral Programme, the University of Reading and the Zurich University of the Arts, ZHdK

Short presentations by young curators from Israel and Switzerland including: Hila Cohen Schneiderman, Bar Yerushalmi, Gili Zaidman, Eveline Mathis and Anastasia Chaguidouline.

Artistic interventions by local performers including Maya Dunitz, David Lemoine, Oz Malul and Anna Zakrevsky.

On display are scores of by Robert Blatt, Maya Bamberger & Ronny Koren, Ofri Cnaani, Maria Dis, David Lemoine, Christine Ellison, Dganit Elyakim, Eran Hadas, San Keller, Ronald Kolb, Michael Leung, Neue Dringlichkeit, Ceyda Oskay, Dorothee Richter, Anike Joyce Sadiq, Yael Sloma, Pongpan Suriyapat, Nir Segal, Anat Pick, Kacey Wong, Zoncy, and works by Anastasia Chaguidouline, Axel Crettenand and Kacey Wong.

Curatorial direction: Prof. Dr. Dorothee Richter, Ronald Kolb
Curation of local iteration: Hadas Kedar (director Studio Bank)
Project Management: Julia Yablonsky

Studio Bank is an art project housed in a seven-story building that was once the headquarters of one of the main banks of Israel. More than forty creative people from different areas of expertise, including: performance, sound, visual art, theater, film, poetry, design, choreography and illustration have been assigned studio spaces in the building. Two studio residencies have been put aside for overseas professionals.
Situated on the west bank of one of the commercial streets of the city – Ben Yehuda “Straße” -surrounded by Bauhaus architecture, galleries, boutiques and cafes, the location of “Studio Bank” highlights the street’s role in the ongoing effort made by the founders of Israel to assimilate into a European-like cultural center.
The project’s in-between stage (former bank / future hotel) – its temporality – is strengthened by its proximity to the beach. In the last two decades, with the rise of tourism to the area, the beach has developed into the main focus point of the city. It attracts residents and tourists for sport, culture and commercial activities. With its popularity comes a real concern about its future. The dynamic quality of the nearby shoreline, inscribing and erasing the escalating sea level, serves as a reminder of the fragility of our natural resources.

Hadas Kedar (Director of “Studio Bank”) is a researcher, lecturer and curator based in Tel Aviv-Yaffo and in the Naqab desert. She is the founder of the Tel Aviv-Yaffo municipal gallery “Nuzhaa” and the Arad municipal gallery and residency spaces “Art and Architecture Arad” and “Arad Contemporary Art Center”.
Kedar is a graduate of Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Israel) and Middlesex University (UK) and is currently a PhD candidate in the Postgraduate Programme in Curating at Zurich.

Maya Bamberger, Itay Blaish, David Carnal, Ronny Koren, Domenico Roberti
Zurich
02.04.2019

Reach to Eat// Dinner #1

Maya:
We have a set of questions that are made to make people fall in love.
Ronny:
Maybe we just pick up few questions from that questionnaire?
Itay:
If you find someone attractive you do not necessarily…

David:
But now I have a question to all for of you; what made you come to Switzerland in the first place?

Itay:
For me it was a project that brought me here, it was clear to me I need to leave Tel Aviv and my future is not going to be there.

David
But Tel Aviv is a fun city!

Itay:
It is but you work your ass off and get pay very little.

David:
But why Zurich?

Itay:
Because of the summer here.

David:
Maya, so you’ve missed the summer here. I ate tomatoes from our balcony. Chill on the balcony until the sun set at 9.30 pm.

Itay:
Or swim in the Limmat with a floating bag.

Ronny:
It’s an amazing place.

Itay:
Agree, in Israel we say that the Swiss landscape is like a chocolate wrap.

Domenico:
So how do you call this salad?

Ronny:
In the salad we have spinach, almonds, dates and pita bread, and lemon zest.

Itay:
Is the recipe from Ottolenghi?

Maya:
Yes, but it could have been better if I had Sumack..

Domenico:
But usually, his recipes have A LOT of ingredients.Long list of ingredients, most of them just spices.

Ronny:
Would you like some water?

Itay:
yes please.

Maya:
the kitchen is a mess!

(George: no worries!)

Maya:
It’s my fault!

Domenico:
It’s very flavourful, Maya.

Maya:
It’s not only me, we did everything together.

Ronny:
I was the sous chef.

Maya:
No, that’s not true, we did everything together.

Ronny:
Yes but it’s mainly your recipes.

Maya:
Which I didn’t invent.

Ronny:
Ok guys I need you to raise your glasses and cheer, and I will take a photo from above.

David:
But you need to cheer as well.

Ronny:
you will cheer for me.

Ronny:
-click-click-click-

Domenico:
Looks like one of these shootings for resorts.

Itay:
Shutter Stock!

Ronny:
Getty Images

Itay:
Google query “four people cheering with wine”

Maya:
I think we need an image on Instagram tomorrow

Ronny:
Yes we should

Itay:
Instagram? Why?

Maya:
Because life is on Instagram

David:
I feel like Instagram is just the next Facebook, it will not be relevant in 5 years anymore

Maya:
We need to be there. If you do something in art or design, it’s very relevant.

Domenico:
But it’s gaining so much traction. I read this article saying that there are collectors that buy art just from Instagram. When they buy, the can pay 30-40 millions, just from liking a picture

Itay:
My master thesis project is exactly this. It’s a bit problematic to speak about it here because it’s a group of curators. I am also a curator, but of a different kind. I think that curation in galleries is obsolete. It’s old. There are so many new forms that has to be investigated. The way we consume art through internet changed so much, but people still see the galleries as the place for art, but I think nope, sorry. People become artists through Instagram, even if no art collector define them as artists, they do define themselves this way, there are actually forms that are being ignored by the art world because they are happening online.

David:
Is Banksy an artist?

Domenico:
Depends who you ask.

Maya:
Common, he is effecting the discourse, of course he is an artist.

Itay:
but that’s the problem, it is art, but in an article I read about Banksy he said: Banksy is a great artist but a graphic design exercise. You just get a small arty orgasm.

Domenico:
I agree with you, that’s exactly the conversation about high art and low art. A lot of curators in the past century have been trying so hard to knock it down that whatever forms of creativity is a type of art, but it’s the matter of context that actually decides the class of where it belongs to. We can argue that Banksy is probably not an artist that speaks to us, because we have to admit the higher you grow in the education of visual arts, the more refine and snobbish you become about what you like and what you don’t.

Itay:
I don’t think it’s low art compared to High art. It’s art, but I don’t find it interesting. I just think that if the message of his work comes so fast, and leaves so fast, it’s just not important.

Domenico:
it’s the same level of the New Yorkers sketches. I think he is very much like that.

Ronny:
But who to decide what’s are and what’s not in the artwrold? In many ways, institutions. And more specifically, the ones who set the tone of arts value are the auction houses.

Domenico:
There’s a distinction between academic and market and they just don’t always go together.

Itay:
My theory says that the discourse is owned by the art scene of galleries, curators and collectors. But suddenly you have more and more at that is available online,. In places outside of the white cube, in parties for instance. Things that didn’t happen before. I still think that the art talk is reserves to galleries, but from where I come from it’s only these alternative forms, underground. Off spaces.

Ronny:
Have you found some of these in Zurich?

Itay:
No. And the reason is because they have too much money. But you see it in Krakow, Berlin, Tel Aviv. The scene is booming.

Maya:
But it’s a different type of art.

Itay:
No, that’s exactly the mistake, that’s what curators say. And this is the problem.

Maya:
But it is!

Itay:
No, it’s not. Because it presented in a messy way, it is something different, I agree, something that could be challenged and you’re right. But the art itself, the processes art of art. But if you could think about the quality as a curator, you could have a proper exhibition. But it’s easy to dismiss it by saying: oh this space is not a gallery.

Maya:
It’s not what I think. When I consume it through the music, hipster, cool scene, I don’t feel I belong to this world.

Ronny:
I agree with you, Itay. I bought at least three pieces at LaCulture in Tel Aviv over the years. And I do think that when you nail it down you can find really good works there. It’s a market, and definitely different than the white cube.

Itay:
That’s exactly what I would like to do, to bridge it out. I feel the the visual communicator is a missing link in art shows. The curator usually is too disconnected and there should be middle men to communicate it to the world.

Maya: I actually think that graphic designers are usually looking at me like I have no idea what I’m doing.

Itay:
But I’m talking about something different, as a designer working on an art show, the designer works together with the curator. They are interested In mutual success. I’m just saying that as a designer, I can have an impact on an art show.

Ronny:
The crowd however is so different. We are talking about much cheaper works being sold in a market place; nothing like a gallery.

Itay:
That’s exactly the idea. Re-inventing the scene.What I’m suggesting to artists – how about creating works that are bought for much less, so you could have a younger crowd? I noticed its working very well.

Domenico:
The biggest things about art, is what you just said, that galleries of course sell a status and symbol, a commodity. The difference between an Artwork and a Lamborghini is that a Lamborghini never actually states any social project. Lots of artworks speak about something completely different like immigration, the artwork sometimes claims to be something completely different than what it actually is.

Maya:
Then why can’t it be both?

Domenico:
It is both, in the same time

Maya:
And when you are a super rich person but you have this migrant painting in your living room, isn’t it hypocrisy?

Domenico:
It makes the rich person feel better, as if she engages with the conversation about migration but you’re not doing anything about it. It’s like hosting a charity event.

Maya:
I think what motivated me, is the fact that artists need the money. Also gallerists.

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